Streamer Junkie

  • 09

    April

    2015

    JP Ross releases One Bug 2015 fly rod for donation and fund raiser

    For the second year, JP Ross is donating a rod for the FUDR One Bug Tournament.  FUDR MISSION STATEMENTTo protect, preserve and enhance the ecosystem and cold-water fishery of the Upper Delaware River System and to address any environmental threats to our area for the benefit of local communities, residents and visitors to the region.    This rod is a 7'9" 3 weight 4 piece beaver meadow with custom engraved Abel TR light Reel  Gold folding hook keeper and silver frame with green agate strip guide.   hand signed by JP Ross  also features a black rod tube with custom engraved case cap  A silver reel seat with Adirondack Box Elder wood insert and Brook trout engraving  Beaver Meadow Progressive Medium Action  Chrome single foot guides in tigers eye thread wraps  and a genuine jungle cock feather inlay.    show your support this May.    2015 One Bug:  May 1, 2,...
  • 07

    April

    2015

    Trout Power 2015

    Trout Power 2015: Event update and initiative update.   Since our last Trout Power® event in 2014 we have been working diligently to attempt to create a new protected zone on the West Canada Creek to harbor trophy fish. Our study’s have shown that there is little if any evidence that wild brown trout live in the creek at all. However, we did find that there are some, not many, but some wild brook trout in the creek. Note that there are over 60 tributaries in the middle section of the creek from Dover Road to Newport Dam. Our work right now is figuring out with the state how we can use these resources. In 2015 we will not be holding a tournament; however we will be doing a stream wide clean up. After the spring floods there is a lot of junk, both on the side of the road...
  • 05

    April

    2015

    A Spring Adirondack Scouting Expedition by Mark Usyk

    All winter I waited for spring. All winter I tied flies for better days. Warmer days. Fly fishing open water days. All winter I peered through curtains of icicles out the windows of my fishing room, beyond the icicles a frozen over Trout and Small Mouth creek. All winter I moaned and groaned about ice and snow and below zero temperatures. I mused at ideas of living in the Florida Keys and poured over internet photos of sunny days and wading the salt flats for Permit and Bonefish, or swinging huge streamers for ice out Pike, or exploring dense Adirondack forest streams in search of 6 inch wild Brook trout with crisp white trimmed fins while fighting off the biting black flies. Then spring arrived and winter clung to the earth and refused to let go of the water. And finally as the first day of Trout season approached only...
  • 29

    March

    2015

    Simply Fish by Mark Usyk

     When I was younger, I had no real understanding of fly fishing. And when I get questions about it now that I’m a fly fisherman myself, I see that those same misunderstandings are still as strong as ever in the non-fly fishing crowd. In the past two months I’ve had more than one non fly fisherman tell me that they thought the whole point behind the casting back and forth over the water was to make the fish think it was a bug flying around so that they would want to eat it. And I think a lot of these misconceptions are what keep many fisherman from picking up a fly rod in the first place… They don’t even understand what it is. Fly fishing is what you make it. And there’s no right or wrong way to do it. I explained to a friend a while back that...
  • 22

    March

    2015

    Adirondack Reasoning by Mark Usyk

    The hike in was more of an impatient trot. I only had so much time for fishing today, and the drive up had taken an hour and a half as it was. In clumsy waders and with a whippy fly rod I hurried down the trail, the sound of the water coming and going as the trail passed close to the creek and then veered away again more than once. Finally the trail ended at the small set of falls, and after my first cast, my hurried state of mind slowed to a speed of “Just right.” The olive Wollybugger tumbled in the turbulence then washed out into the current flowing from the falls. Not a flash, but the darting of something dark and fishy as the line went tight. Black pit eyes and fins trimmed in white. If God is real, then this is what he wants me to...
  • 19

    March

    2015

    Orange Palmered Hackle: variation of the Palmered Caddis

    The Palmered Caddis is not a Griffis Gnat, and it may have actually originated in Rome, NY. The traditional Palmered Caddis is peacock with a grizzly and brown hackle palmered forward convex style towards the hook eye. This fly is a little different but based on the same principal.
    The Palmered Caddis is not a Griffis Gnat, and it may have actually originated in Rome, NY. The traditional Palmered Caddis is peacock with a grizzly and brown hackle palmered forward convex style towards the hook eye. This fly is a little different but based on the same principal. Tie this fly with floss right on the bobbin. Tie in your floss, tie in your grizzly hackle, wrap your floss forward, hackle your fly and tie off. Orange seems to just make Adirondack flies fish better. Perhaps it’s the dark tannin water or just the fact you can see the fly which helps you track it on the surface. This is especially important as the palmered flies like this are also effective stripped back underneath the water. Many a brook trout have been caught on a drowned fly, teaching the angler to never stop drifting or playing your cast. The...
  • 15

    March

    2015

    All Winters Must End By Mark Usyk

    I shoveled a path to the grill through a foot and a half of heavy, wet snow. As I stood there grilling burgers and sipping on a porter in a long sleeved t-shirt I couldn’t help but smile. I could finally hear the current of the creek, the ice melting away in several small patches enough for the water to call out to me, to let me know it would be ready soon. As we finished our dinner, Holly says to me “You can go fishing for a little bit if you want, the boys will be leaving for religion class soon anyhow. I shrug my shoulders. “I don’t know, maybe.” I clean my plate at the sink and look out at the sun shining, the bright orange ball of fire hangs just above the trees and the frozen creek. The thermometer says it’s 52. I slap myself in the...
  • 15

    March

    2015

    Coyote Ugly Clouser:

    This version of the Clouser Minnow is tied entirely from coyote fur. If you have a chance to get your hands on a coyote pelt, acquire it. In fact you may want to try to get a few, because of the huge variation in the fur color and texture. You’ll notice there’s a big difference between the texture of the back fur, the belly and the tail. Some guard hairs will be very banded, others almost white. My good friend Steve Bechard may have actually been the inventor of this fly. At the time of its birth we were fishing often for carp on Oneida Lake. It was then that we discovered coyote fur was a great material for matching the tan crayfish that were lingering around on the mud and sand flats.I‘ve fished this fly for trout, bass, brim and even snook and redfish. It is a very effective fly and the material was chosen to imitate a breathing action even when the fly is not being retrieved. The under-fur of a mammal that does not normally swim in the water, usually makes for a very soft texture. Also the slight curl to the hair I believe helps trap air bubbles which gives it some glint in the water. This version of the Clouser Minnow is tied entirely from coyote fur. If you have a chance...
  • 15

    March

    2015

    Adirondack Caddis:

    JP Ross ADK Elk Hair Caddis

    This fly is really nothing more than an Elk Hair Caddis with an Adirondack twist. The first time I saw a fly like this was in my fly shop. A gentleman who taught me a lot about fly fishing had a fly very similar to this. He called it the “West Canada Caddis.” I actually have found added success by taking this fly a little further with its colors. Fran Betters, a famous Adirondack fly tyer, used to tie all his flies with hot orange. It is important that this is not fluorescent orange, or hot pink, it is hot orange.

    This fly is really nothing more than an Elk Hair Caddis with an Adirondack twist. The first time I saw a fly like this was in my fly shop. A gentleman who taught me a lot about fly fishing had a fly very similar to this. He called it the “West Canada Caddis.” I actually have found added success by taking this fly a little further with its colors. Fran Betters, a famous Adirondack fly tyer, used to tie all his flies with hot orange. It is important that this is not fluorescent orange, or hot pink, it is hot orange. A few old timers would bring the orange to the shop when they used to teach fly tying classes there. I remember that at times we sold more hot orange thread than we did simple black. It was a sign that we found something that really did work. The...
  • 08

    March

    2015

    To Be a Fishing Guide By Mark Usyk

    I’ve been doing a lot of reading lately. Fishing stories mainly. I’ve been doing quite a bit of writing too. Again, fishing stories. And I’ve been tying a few flies. And jigs of marabou and rabbit strips for my buddies that don’t fly fish. I’ve found myself over the past couple years really questioning what it is I want out of life, seeing as how I’m knocking on 40yrs old and don’t count on seeing 80, half way through life seems as good a time as any to wonder if you’re doing it wright. Some might call it a mid-life crisis. I don’t call it anything except reality. A couple of the books I’ve read recently were authored by fishing guides. Great stories of leaving promising careers and familiar surroundings behind in search of fresh air, freedom, and doing what they want to do for life…Not for a living…for life....
  • 06

    March

    2015

    Hot Cone Olive Muddler Minnow:

    This fly was a fly I first tied over a pot of coffee on a terribly wet day at the fly shop. I knew that hot orange worked, and I knew that olive was also a very effective color. I walked around the shop, grabbed some olive deer hair, olive marabou and tied some up. This fly was a fly I first tied over a pot of coffee on a terribly wet day at the fly shop. I knew that hot orange worked, and I knew that olive was also a very effective color. I walked around the shop, grabbed some olive deer hair, olive marabou and tied some up. I gave a number of them away that day and asked some guys I knew to fish them and find out how they worked. In 24 hours I had a patron back in the shop asking me to tie more. I was never a big custom fly tier and only did it when I had to, and rarely charged money to do so because I didn’t think I was that good at it. I was nervous people would get disappointed if they didn’t catch anything. Now over ten years later I realize I probably gave...
  • 01

    March

    2015

    Fishing on the Road By Mark Usyk

    For three days we had given it our best shot. Driving from the job site in Big Flats NY to our hotel in Elmira, I had located what was supposed to be a “Trout Stream”. Looking down from the cell tower we were working on, it actually flowed by no more than 200yrds from where we worked, and after staring at it most of the day I had convinced myself that my 3wt fly rod was not only perfect for the tiny stream, but that it would find a Trout within the first 3 casts. On the first day, I was wrong. My co-worker Mike, with his spinning rod, also found nothing at the end of his line over and over. I managed to catch two more branches than Trout on the second day. Seeing as how I caught two branches, the second day was also a bust. We also...
  • 22

    February

    2015

    Summer Day Dreaming At 3am By Mark Usyk

    2:30 A.M. The alarm rouses me from a dead sleep. I quietly move through the house, trying not to wake up my wife and boys. The clank of a coffee cup as I pull it from the cupboard makes me shake my head, half expecting to see a 5 year old boy appear in the kitchen doorway because of it. I make two cups and spill it everywhere except into the thermos as I try to fill it up. Again, I shake my head. It’s 2:35. I should be sleeping. I walk out into a room off of the back of the house. One containing my fly tying bench, a rustic table with burned images of fish I have caught and have yet to catch, the walls covered in antique fishing tackle and a book shelf made from a cedar tree trunk I pulled out of the creek out back....
  • 15

    February

    2015

    Fly Fishing Therapy Part 4 (The End) By Mark Usyk

    The third day found Mike and I up on the tower in the bright sun under beautiful blue Adirondack skies, wearing rain jackets, wishing we had ski jackets and face masks. The rain jackets were a feeble attempt to break the wind and hold in what little body heat we had, the sun and blue sky a cruel joke which started when we parked the trucks and saw what the morning news told us we would see…sun and no clouds. The punch line came when we climbed the tower and harnessed off, leaning back and looking out over the sprawling green that spread in every direction to the horizon. As we waited for our tools and materials to make their way up to us on the rope, we began to realize that although the day appeared to be a warm late summer day down on the ground, it was much...
  • 08

    February

    2015

    Fly Fishing Therapy Part 3 By Mark Usyk

    The next morning as we unloaded the John Deer ATV from a trailer at the base of Lyon Mountain Mike and I talked about the great section of river we’d found the day before. We wanted to get through the work day as fast as we could so we could get back to the Saranac and find out what was around the next bend, and the next after that. There was no helicopter getting us to the top today. For the rest of the week it would be up to us, a four man crew clawing its way up the mountain on a two man ATV. Two front seats and a small bed. As we started up the goat path, left behind by the installation of the power poles that carried electricity to the tower site at the top. Mike and I sat on top of our climbing harnesses in...
  • 02

    February

    2015

    Fly Fishing Therapy Part 2 By Mark Usyk

    There is nothing quite like the line pulling tight and the jerk of the rod tip on your very first cast. I immediately laugh out loud. I’ve forgotten the day with one cast. The line darts left and right but I can feel that the fish is small. No matter, it’s a fish, and I’ve caught it. It ends up being a Rock Bass about the size of my hand, a mix of bronze and black, with the typical large red eyes. They eat everything, little pigs with gills I call them. I return it to the water, and within two casts I have another. Off to my right is the power house we parked the truck next to, the rumble of the water discharging back into the river almost drowns out the voice of my climbing and fishing companion for the week. Mike yells to me something undiscernible, but...
  • 26

    January

    2015

    Fly Fishing Therapy-Part 1 By Mark Usyk

    I’m at about the 200’ mark on a communications tower atop Lyon Mt in the northern Adirondacks. The day started out easy enough, exploring a small mountain stream while waiting for our ride. Then our ride landed, and the exploring was brought to an end. Most of the day has been spent flying equipment, tools, and materials up the mountain via cargo net and helicopter. It’s much colder up here than I had anticipated. I’m dressed for late August, but up here in the wind it feels more like October. I fight not to shiver. My foreman calls on the radio for me to finish up for the day. The helicopter is on its way. They’ll make two trips taking things down before the final trip I need to be on. So get moving. I hear the reverberations of the blades and scan the sky where the tree tops meet...
  • 18

    January

    2015

    If Only I Had Carried a Fly Rod By Mark Usyk

    Years ago a friend and my two younger brothers and I arranged to be dropped off in Tupper Lake up in the Adirondacks. Our plan was to hike 50 some odd miles south to Twitchell Lake over 4 days. On my back was a small pack containing the minimum essentials and of course, a fishing rod. In those days I was fishing an ultra-light spinning rod and marabou jigs. It was a spectacular 4 days that I think of often. We camped alongside an abandoned beaver pond the first night fed by a stream no more than 2’ wide in some places, and caught wild Brook Trout with colors so dark you could hardly believe them. Fish I guarantee had never seen any kind of artificial lure before. Waking up that next morning and watching the fog wisp away off the pond’s surface as Brookies slashed at something on the...
  • 13

    January

    2015

    The Mohawk River.

    It is nearly three hundred years from today. You begin to string up your fly line through your guides as you notice a tribe of Iroquois Indian Braves, paddling in unison in birch bark canoes with nets full of brook trout ranging in size from 6 to 10 lbs. You begin fly-casting and hook a 9 pound brook trout in full spawning colors. Your trophy fish is large but not nearly as large as some of the other fish rising in the large expanse of water you are fishing. Its is now the late 1700’s, the water you are fishing is now a bit slower than it was 100 years ago, and the views of Long Houses have been replaced by fields of corn, stacks of fresh cut lumber and in the far distance you can see a fort, built complete with stockades and cannons. You begin to string up...
  • 12

    January

    2015

    Fly Fishing is Emotion By Mark Usyk

    It begins in the shop of the rod maker. The time spent designing. The ideas thrown around about materials and components. They are all personal choices to both the rod maker and the customer for whom this 9’ 5wt magic wand is for. Blood, sweat, tears, and anguish over the smallest details goes into the build, an expression of the artist and an extension of the angler. The rod maker is an artist, and art is self-expression. It is their way of giving to those around them, of making their peers hopefully feel a little of what the artist feels. It continues on the first time the owner first sets eyes on his or her new fly rod. They pour over the details, taking in all the hard work, the perfection of the wraps, the gloss of the finish. The feel of smooth cork in their hand. But it is most...
  • 05

    January

    2015

    Falling in Love With Fall Fish on the Fly.... By Mark Usyk

    Standing in the water, the current pushes against me and I struggle for footing with my old Converse sneakers on the smooth and slimy rocks of the creek bed. I study the current out in front of me as it washes through the downed tree and picture the bronze colors and tiger stripe markings of the Smallmouth I’m sure must be under the ledge of the deep cutout bank just downstream from it. I make my cast, almost landing the tiny streamer in the tree limbs that hide barely below the surface, but it clears them and I brace my reflexes for the strike I feel is inevitable.   A flash from the bottom, not from under the bank, and it heads straight back to the bottom of the pool and races downstream. It takes line. It doesn’t like being bullied into coming to the top, and it pulls hard...
  • 31

    December

    2014

    JP Ross Beaver Meadow, design yours today...

    Design yours here.   
  • 29

    December

    2014

    Last day of Trout Season By Mark Usyk

    It’s the last week of Trout season in NY, and I find myself hopping rocks on the Black River below North Lake in the Adirondacks. I’ve come here in search of small and wild Brook Trout while most everyone else I asked to come along gave the excuse of “Why would I want to go looking for those little fish while the Salmon are starting to run up in Pulaski?” Truth be told, none of them are on the Salmon River that weekend. The excuse they use for not wanting to come along on a fishing weekend is big fish that they have no intention of actually going after. They sit at home and watch reality TV. I feel bad for them, but because I’m alone it’s quiet and I can fish as long as I want, go upstream as far as I please without worrying if someone else is...
  • 18

    October

    2014

    JP Ross Releases the Trail Blazer Small Stream "everything" Rod


    For a limited time, we made 4 of these cool rods.  They are 8 foot 5 weight 4 piece.  They come with a Kershaw Knife, and a JP Ross Wood Fly Box. All for $299.00
    For a limited time, we made 4 of these cool rods.  They are 8 foot 5 weight 4 piece.  They come with a Kershaw Knife, and a JP Ross Wood Fly Box. All for $299.00 Click here for more. 
  • 04

    October

    2014

    New TV Show on Destination America

    I found this TV show this morning.  Its pretty cool. Check it out.     http://www.silverkingstv.com/     SILVER KINGS 2014/2015 Season 1 Trailer from Brine Media on Vimeo.  
  • 27

    September

    2014

    A great compliment from a happy Beaver Meadow Customer

    The Beaver Meadow small stream fly rod, the perfect fly rod for exploring small streams for native fish. Hello, summer has come to a end and I just wanted to give your beaver meadow 6'6" another nod to perfection! I have used this rod off and on now for a couple of seasons and I can say it still out performs all other rods on the small creek I call home. This season I put it up against a Zg helios 7'6" 3w. The beaver meadow out performs the rod in my opinion.The feel,action and sensitivity of the B.M.just can't be beat.Thanks for another great year on the waterBest regards, Dave   Dave, also shared some pictures from his favorite stream, where he fishes his Beaver Meadow Small Stream Fly Rod        
  • 27

    September

    2014

    A chilly day in the keys.. but the snapper are bitting

    Rich Burson of R U Fishing Yet says that it is a cold day for fly fishing in Islamorada Florida, but that does not mean there is nothing to catch.  This time of year you can go for Snook, Redfish, Snapper and baby Tarpon.    This day Rich came home with some snappers that are going to taste great on the grill.     
  • 23

    September

    2014

    It's all in the history.....

    Reflecting back on the season there are many adventures that I was able to experience this year.  Fishing in Labrador Canada for Trophy Brook Trout, and finally landing a huge Tarpon on the fly in Islamorada Florida with my wife Bobbi Jo.      But it all comes back to the real stuff, the history of what got me started in this whole thing nearly 20 years ago...  Catching wild brook trout in the Adirondacks.     Its funny how life can take you all over the world, and you keep coming back to your roots.  What matters to you, and what you feel like you really are an expert at.  For me, and for our company, it's not always about the fish.  Its about sharing these experiences with our friends and family...  experiencing what counts with the ones we love.   JP
  • 24

    April

    2014

    Catching Kokanee Red Salmon on the fly

         It was a cool, crisp morning as I stepped out of my Honda Ridgeline and I couldn’t help but smell the sweet aroma of autumn in the air.  The leaves had already started to change from the lush spring and summer greens to the magnificent autumn yellows, reds and oranges.  This makes the landscape along the Columbia River in Fairmont, British Columbia a breathtaking sight to behold at this time of year.  This is also the time of year when the Kokanee Salmon leave Columbia Lake to start their fall run up the Columbia River to their spawning grounds.  The color of the Kokanee, at this time of year, is a magnificent scarlet red.    As I walked along the river, back to my truck, to retrieve my gear, I could see these red Kokanee hold in mere inches of water; as well as in the deep runs...
  • 24

    November

    2012

    Old school – with a twist!

    The first fish of the morning, A very nice colored up male.  The JP Ross 7 weight switch did the trick again, helping me to land this beauty of a lake run rainbow.  Another deeply colored lake run brown Hurricane Sandy made a huge difference in the conditions of our local WNY tributaries. And I was there several days after to take full advantage of high stained water, and aggressive lake run trout. The salmon had been in full spawn mode for a good week or two and the river bottom was filled with eggs. Sandy dumped enough water to raise the stream levels and stir up the salmon reds, releasing thousands of eggs into the stream. The water also encouraged a big push of fresh fish that were very aggressive. The combination of fish and water made for a very memorable couple of hours on the water that I don’t...
  • 24

    November

    2012

    Kabuto Fiberglass Rod Build. 7 foot 6 inch 4 weight.

  • 22

    September

    2012

    Jet Boating

    Jet boating for Smallmouth bass on a fly rod....

     

    Jet Boating and stream or river fly fishing for smallmouth bass Yesterday I spent the afternoon taking my 15 foot Tracker Jon Boat on the Mohawk River.  I outfitted the boat with a 25hp Mercury Jet Drive.  This is something I have been looking forward to doing for about ten years.  I always had envy for people jet boating and fishing for Smallmouth Bass with a fly rod in the Susquehanna River in PA…  I wanted to do it here in my own back yard.  It turns out that saving some pennies and having a dream pays off.  This is the most enjoyable boat I think I have ever had. We started in the Barge Canal, and if you are familiar with the Canal in Central NY, there are a lot of little run off areas on it which connect to the Mohawk River.  If you can get to one and it has some current in it,...
  • 26

    April

    2010

    Ever Hear of a Tiger Trout???

    Have you ever heard of a tiger trout? I did one day when I was reading an article in an American Angler issue last year. They mentioned that there are tiger trout in NY, Cobleskill Reservoir to be specific. The Cobleskill Reservoir is also mentioned by the NY DEC Fishing Regulations for Schoharie County as the Holding Pond. This seems to be one of the most fished bodies of water in Schoharie County. This pond is stocked with rainbow, brown and tiger trout. The DEC has been stocking 9 to 14 inch brown and rainbow trout for years. In addition, the Coby Fish and Game Club have been stocking 12 to 16 inch tiger trout in the Holding Pond of the Cobleskill Reservoir for the past 9 years.  The Coby Fish and Game Club raise money to stock these trout in the Cobleskill Reservoir. They purchase the fish from SUNY Cobleskill School of Agriculture and Natural Resources were...

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