Stream Lyrics

  • 19

    October

    2016

    A note to my 12 year old son.

      A Note to My 12 Year Old Son     I guess I’m not surprised at the emerging young man that you are turning out to be. And sometimes you need to be told how proud of you I really am. I know that my schedule keeps me away for longer than you would like and, in this hectic pace of travel and attending to other people and their needs, I sometimes forget about yours.   You have shown that you are thoughtful and compassionate to others and this might be the simple greatest achievement in this world where narcissism is rampant and undermines most concepts of community. You have demonstrated that you have developed a conscience and can be introspective but heed a word of advice and some practical real world experience from your father here: knowing your limits is a good thing but don’t be afraid to...
  • 27

    September

    2016

    Quirks and the Crisis of the Rise

    People have quirks. And so do most fly rods. People with quirks can cast quirky rods and the amplitude of the quirkiness becomes exponential. And that’s why it took me so long to learn how to cast.  Is it the rod? or is the person who holds the rod? Things can get muddied pretty quick when you start breaking it down this far. How many fish did you miss because of your quirks? How many fish did you miss because of your rod?  Perhaps we should consider that people who Fly Fish have inherent quirks that drive them to participate in the sport initially? And what would the level of quirk be for those that have continued the habit/hobby for 20 years plus?  But somewhere along in the multitudinal craziness is the spine tingling nerviness of the crisis of the rise. It’s when the trout shows their shoulders, simply sips...
  • 11

    September

    2016

    Fly and Rind

      I don’t think I’m a hermit but I’m not far from it. I’d rather find the solitude of fishing a stream or creek than put myself in the throbbing masses of a retail environment, a large scale sporting event, or sometimes even a grocery store. Irony, lies within those statements, as my work usually encompasses attendance that range in to tens of thousands.   Charming is not often used to describe me, although I can occasionally display it; perhaps it would be best to consider me anti-social although that descriptive term contains too many sociological behaviors that are worrisome to me. I think it is best to consider me as a “social exclusionary”; but I meet the most interesting people while out in the woods and those conversations are often impetus for table top conversations and dining room discussions that cover philosophy, history, and strategy.     The boy...
  • 10

    September

    2016

    6 simple tricks to help teach a beginner to fly fish

    In the words of Roderick Haig-Brown, “I had to learn a lot on my own which is a fascinating process but a slow one.”, but given the circumstances where opportunities intersect with drive and/or ambition, the learning curve is diminished. Fly fishing is no different, and if patience and dedication are applied, then the outcome becomes less in importance than the journey.   It’s the journey that has become enjoyable. Am I a good or expert with a fly rod? Hardly, but I have since learned enough tricks along the way to make the process enjoyable and it can be downright enlightening.  Often enough, people become frustrated early and it’s the line tangles, lack of fish, or the seemingly endless manner in which to tackle the subject or sport that diminish the starter’s enjoyment. And to tackle this supposed wall, I’ve developed a manner in which I can share my...
  • 27

    April

    2016

    6 tips on the importance of using stealth while fly fishing

    One of the most overlooked techniques of being a successful fly angler is the ability to stalk or employ methods of stealth while fishing, especially while wading. Fish can be easily spooked by a shadow, motion (induced by casting), or sound and the ability to employ a visual and auditory slyness can often times be advantageous to the angler searching out those crafty fins whether they be in a mountain trout stream or bass in a warm water creek.   Here are some simple tips for making the most of a few hours standing in a small stream and waving a stick with the ever optimistic hope of landing a fish or two.   Wear muted colors such as olive, dark green, or shades of gray. Sure, your hero pictures won’t look as amazing as those national geographic shots but the ability to break up your outline or reduce the...
  • 24

    April

    2016

    Buckets

        Waders are essentially high priced buckets. It is quite amazing when an expensive piece of space age fabric, designed to keep one warm and comfortable, is instantly transformed into a simple and cheap bucket. What once was a barrier between you and cold water can quickly become a vessel that contains gallons of cold water that soaks and chills your underwear and pools in the legs. It often happens in the shock of a second, a missed step, and a sigh of cold aggravation.  Other than that, I’m often thankful for my waders as they offer me a little protection as I wander through lush and thriving forests of poison ivy, poison oak, and stinging nettles. I guess it’s a trade off.  Fishing around these parts can be frustrating, the small streams are often blown out early in the season and the springs rain can make a normally...
  • 25

    March

    2016

    Part 2 Fly Fishing and Travel; Ironies and Absurdities

      It was hard to say when winter arrived. It kind of snuck in, inconspicuous from day to day but it settled in sometime during the fall bow hunt. Morning temps never reached their goals, the cold winds started to blow, and the trees lost their battle against the wind, and the leaves simply lost out. That was months ago and the weight of winter now feels like a burden; it has become a coat that has become too heavy to wear comfortably.   By December, the season was entrenched and the stark sycamore bones showed clearly against the monotone Kentucky skies; the boundaries of seasons were clearly defined and even the mud puddles and meadows crisped with first, a hard frost, and then, layer after layer of snow. There is something very stark about Kentucky winters, although it has never kept us out of the woods, and the wind...
  • 18

    March

    2016

    Sometimes it's not about the fish--by Joseph Lloyd

        Sometimes it’s not about the fish at all. Most of the time it’s just having a shared memory of the day, the stream, and the camaraderie of being outside with loved ones. Thankfully, I have a fishing partner in my wife or is it my wife and then fishing partner? Regardless, she’s just as quick to suggest that we pick up our gear and go on a road trip somewhere; and it might be the journey that contains road trip playlists, the laughs, and gas station coffee that always seem to accompany my smelly old truck. Btw—she can throw down with Salt N Pepa, Kid Rock, and Lil Kim, spitting lyrics going down the road at 80 mph, with the best of them.   The luck of having of a wife who fishes is immense; gone are the snide and darkly sarcastic comments that accuse an obsessed fisherman...
  • 08

    March

    2016

    Women in Waders and Men in the Kitchen? by Joseph Lloyd

    My wife says some funny things to me. Her wit is sharp and usually delivered with deadpan nuance and without any over-the-top demonstrative action—as if to let the words carry their own weight. I think sometimes she says shit just to see if I’m listening (see earlier post about my pre-curmudgeonly condition). I should write them down when I get the chance just to record her humor through the years but, then again, maybe our kids already know it. How could they not recognize?  She doesn’t speak loudly or use an extraordinary amount of words to articulate her thoughts and her tongue can be biting at times. I’m the acerbic one though—please remember that. Her wit is both calculated and timely; her thoughts are usually steps ahead of my own—and she will continually trap me in clever word play but she brought up a much larger issue recently that I...
  • 01

    March

    2016

    Dishwashers and Top Secret Midges by Joseph Lloyd

    I really hate emptying the dishwasher. Especially when it comes to sorting the silverware. It’s mindless, repetitive work but in order to have an effective and well-organized kitchen (and a happier wife), the work has to be done. Conversely, I don’t mind sitting for a couple of hours and tying flies.   Some might consider the two to be similar.   The dishwasher had to be emptied, as tomorrow is my first day on a new job and my favorite 7-year-old ball cap had to be washed. And the dishwasher is the best way I have found to clean a ratty, sweat stained, sun-bleached, and river mud tinged, old ball cap. I’ve heard that you’re supposed to look nice on your first day of work—so it is being washed. I wouldn’t think of leaving it at home.   Pat Dorsey, famed Colorado river guide, accomplished author and all around genuinely...
  • 23

    December

    2015

    Tying a North Country Soft Hackle by Joseph Lloyd

      Our weather has changed and there is no doubt that it has. This winter, so far, is a mixture of blustering winds that are strong enough to blow the neighbor’s trash cans down the street, balmy temperatures high enough to be considered spring, and consistent and daily rains that fill basements and roadways. These rains have blown out the rivers and streams I like to fish and the above average temps have made any sort of hunting particularly difficult so I have resorted to spending a few hours at the vice. And the time has been well spent.   Fly tying is a peculiar endeavor and requires a peculiar individual who would find exacting precision to be pleasing, not unlike the pointillist artist of the late 19th century who neurotically arranged small distinct dots in patterns to trick the eye into seeing a larger image. The art of the...
  • 19

    December

    2015

    Time for a new pair of waders? by Joseph Lloyd

    The time has come-- my old, leaky waders have been warriors and their time spent in the field was much longer than originally anticipated but the last three months of fishing almost every day has taken a toll. They’re done. Kaput. They look like a patchwork quilt of polka dot patches and I was reticent to let them go—kind of like an old guitar that has a particular tone that’s pleasing to the ear or an old truck that has more memories and miles than remaining usefulness. A pair of waders, regardless of the memories of fish caught or particularly enjoyable days out, has to be considered a dependable tool. And this old pair of hammers has done broke.   So I sucked it up and started the long process of trying to find the right replacement. I don’t like spending money; my nature is frugal but my wife simply...
  • 17

    December

    2015

    The River and the Twig and Me by Joseph Lloyd

    ***Laurel River in North Carolina      There’s something about the water and the way it flows around your legs, or the slipperiness of the mud on the slope around it. It’s the smell of the morning mist where a river can create its own fog or the constant trickle or flow that you hear in the night but can’t see. Ponds and lakes aren’t my favorites; it takes the vitality of moving water and only a river can give me what I really want.   It can be a small channel, an undercut riverbank, or a creek fed by run-off but the river contains a grace through association and mystery. The water of a moving river, even a slow one, has a thousand color and shapes but must adhere to defined and longstanding laws of nature-- A river seems to find its own level, inherent to the natural lie...
  • 13

    December

    2015

    Travel and Fly-Fishing-ironies and absurdities by Joseph Lloyd

        Sometimes my life can be funny. Sometimes my life can be tragic. My professional life often entails the absurd. Shit, sometimes my personal life reads like a Charles Bukowski novel but perhaps not as much as it used to. I can thank my wife for her calming nature and enduring patience for the positive change to my personally induced chaos and those Henry Chinaski moments have become less.   I was rough and tumble through the days of my youth, brash to the point of being acerbic. Rash and ready for something other than my small town upbringing, my life smelled like spent shotgun shells and bourbon, and probably looked like a bar fight broken nose to outsiders. The irony lies in the fact that I spent my entire formative years desperately seeking something other than those hills and hollers where I grew up—and now I know that...
  • 04

    December

    2015

    Kitchen spoons in a fly box? by Joseph Lloyd

    Sometimes, it’s the small things that matter. My wife keeps a cup of spoons on the kitchen counter. It sits next to the coffee pot, under the spice cabinet, and right next to a glazed pottery piece that holds all the most-utilized utensils such as spatulas, wire whisks, and tongs. The spoons don’t live in the silverware drawer like all the other mundane kitchen paraphernalia. Nope, the spoons live where we can easily reach them.   And the idea of it is simply brilliant. A working kitchen needs spoons right? They might be the most used item in our kitchen—they stir coffee, they measure a quick teaspoon for recipes, they stir simmering pots, etc… A spoon is the unsung hero of the kitchen, which is, by the way, the room in our house that sees the most use. Most serious conversations happen in the kitchen, it’s where people usually gather...
  • 30

    November

    2015

    Kentucky Conversations by Joseph Lloyd

      My Kentucky, outside of the major urban centers, has an endearing method of communication and it’s the manner of the every-man that I have grown up with. It’s not uncommon to have discussions leaning over the bed of someone else’s truck and it’s a sure sign of comfort and confidence when a relative stranger does the “Kentucky Lean”; Our patter might be tough to understand from someone who hasn’t grown up with it, as the accent might be tough to distinguish but a shuffle of the boot, the tilt of a ball cap, or the glancing looks are not. There is a particular way of communicating around here and everyone from millionaire farmers to factory workers and everyone who should fall in the middle, use it.   But the most enduring conversation that I’ve had in my 46 years on this earth, has been within, and with, the woods...
  • 25

    November

    2015

    notes from the field by Joseph Lloyd

      I'm seemingly on the worlds longest bow hunt and I'm beginning to wonder why I do these things to my self. Self flagellation is an indescribable cold wind that blows steadily in the face ands finds a micro-hole in the back of your jacket and shoots mist to trickle down your spine, it's the cold induced stiffness and pain in an old mans knees that doesn't leave until a couple of hours in a warm truck, and it's the yearly ritual of a bow hunter.   Is this the punishment that I meter out to myself for the karmic penance of my asshole younger self? Or is it the enjoyment of many hours of singular solitude spent in the grey and bare hardwood stretches of my home state?  It would be easier with a rifle but seeing how my family doesn't depend on me as the sole provider of meat...
  • 18

    November

    2015

    Truck Clutter by Joseph Lloyd

    The back of my truck is a mess. It’s always been that way except for the mucking out every two years or so. And if the measure of a man is his vehicle (I really don’t believe this premise by the way) I might be a mess, too. Actually, that is a confirmed status, let’s not be disingenuous about it.   My truck can carry, and often does, all the gear required for a couple of outdoor interests and disciplines and it wouldn’t be uncommon to find: fly rod tubes and leaky waders, a dog cage and three pairs of boots in the bed (wading, snake, and rubber), spent shotgun shells, a bird vest, deer grunt… The sad part is not that this occurs but how much space it requires as I often to have move a few things around just to get the boy or my wife in the...
  • 06

    November

    2015

    Fishing and Kentucky by Joseph Lloyd

    We fished the North Fork of Elkhorn Creek in Franklin County, Kentucky yesterday afternoon when Theresa found a few hours away the confines of the office. My blues seem to go away when traveling down a road barely big enough for the wheels of my truck; the chink of gravel caught in the tires and the crush of fallen leaves seems to give me a piece of mind that I can’t get anywhere else. Therapy is where you find, I guess, and the rolling hills and cliffs of my home woods are the best I know of. The leaves are almost off the trees now except for the few who are stubbornly holding on in a last blast of defiant color against the coming cold. The bones of winter, sycamore and birches, stand tall and starkly white against the gray afternoon skies that only portend of the cold and freezing...
  • 03

    November

    2015

    Beaver Meadow Glass (3 wt) Review by Joseph Lloyd

      I’ve had the opportunity to fish the new Beaver Meadow Glass from JP Ross in his 7’ 3 wt for over 3 months now and I can concisely and accurately describe the rod as excellent. The last two months have seen a real work out as I have fished it almost every day in the streams, creeks, and rivers of Central Kentucky for smallmouth bass. It’s been fished daily so I have a pretty good idea of what the rod can do and can’t; simply put it’s the nicest rod I have ever fished.   The mechanics of the 3 wt Beaver Meadow Glass are strong and it has provided me with hours of fun (and successful) fishing. It casts like a dream, even when loaded with a 5 weight line and still offers an outstanding level of sensitivity. The response of the rod might be considered a medium...
  • 28

    October

    2015

    Modern Band of Anglers by Joseph Lloyd

      My wife sarcastically calls me, “Mr. Chipper” which is probably more accurate than I like to admit, but I just shrug, grunt, and go on; I hope that I’m not going to end up crusty or curmudgeonly. Whoever said “why would I join a club that would have me as a member?”, called it pretty spot on. Imagine a bunch of guys that sit around on stools and grunt acknowledgement at each other? The Rod and Rifle club is pretty inclusive and membership requirements and guidelines are pretty ambiguous; the parameters for joining are the basic appreciation of the hunt with rifle and rod and the ability to have some pretty basic conversations about it. That being said, in my pre-curmudgeon condition, it consistently remains a surprise when I meet someone who I connect with who appreciates similar things.   This modern band of anglers are a peculiar bunch...
  • 26

    October

    2015

    Moment of Stillness by Joseph Lloyd

    There’s a moment of stillness that I try to maintain before I ever step foot into a river or creek. I hold it and try to slow down my heart enough to make sure I feel it. It is a moment of reverence and contemplation; intellectually, it is a quick span of time that I use to observe what might or might not be happening (bugs, current, etc…) but it’s actually more of a moment that I remind myself to slow down and take solace in the fact that I have a chance to block out the noise of the constructs that the modern world maintain on me.   I didn’t grow up with a fly rod in hand nor was I born to do it but the lessons of fly fishing that loom larger than life still educate me when I slow down enough to think about it. A...
  • 23

    October

    2015

    The Idea of Forced Perspective in Fishing by Joseph Lloyd

      Louis Cahill, of Gink and Gasoline (www.ginkandgasoline.com) wrote the following:   "Honestly, if it wasn’t my job I don’t think I’d photograph my fish at all. I think I have posed for photos with fish twice in the last year and one of those times was just for my buddy who wanted to take the pictures. When I think back about great fishing trips I’ve taken, when I find myself smiling at a fond memory, it’s almost never the fish I’m thinking of. It’s the people I fish with. ... I like to think that when I’m finally too old to wade into the river, I’ll look back on my days as an angler and judge my success, not by the size of the fish I caught, but by the friends I made and the size of their hearts."   I can relate to this heartfelt statement as I...
  • 20

    October

    2015

    The Old Blue Canoe (Tattered and Torn Notes) by Joseph Lloyd

      A few years ago my fishing partner and I loaded up the truck with the old blue canoe and hauled ourselves 16 hours northeast of our present position in which we reside to another idyllic (ie.rural/uninhabited) spot in northern new Hampshire. We kind of seek those things out you know.   The old canoe has it own story as we bought it ten years ago and it was, back then, a project (or piece of crap as my partner will say) as it had been a rental canoe that had been ungainly dropped off the trailer resulting in insults and injuries to the old boat. I’m sure that it had given many a day where it allowed itself to be treated poorly at the drunken and inexperienced hands that guided it down the Licking River in KY. The injuries included broken gunwales and bough and the insults to the...
  • 19

    May

    2015

    Fly Fishing Irondequoit creek with Ethan

    With my ability to bite into my favorite grilled foods restored, I now feel whole once again. It's funny how the intense pain of an infected tooth can turn a grown man into a something far less than what he thinks he is. Especially when he can't tear into his favorite hunk of burnt meat!So after getting shot up for the last time with Novocain, and having the dentist poke, prod and pull my tooth for what I hope is the last time, Ethan and I decided it would be a good idea to treat ourselves to a celebratory fishing trip. Besides, the stream we wanted to fish was on our way home and it looked primed for some good fishing!Irondequoit creek is a very well known popular small stream that has a good resident trout population all year long, with the added bonus of lake run trout and salmon that...
  • 19

    May

    2015

    Fly Fishing with Midges part 3

    Over the past few weeks I have had the pleasure to fish small midge patterns to trout while others have gone home after the early morning trico hatch. It has been a lot of fun, and for the most part, very successful.One reason for our success has been the ability to get our small midge patterns in front of fish and keep them there. Trout need to eat - even in the middle of the day during summer. It is just a matter of finding the right spots and presenting the fly to the fish. We have been targeting fish that are in streams with spring influences and spring creeks themselves. This means fishing to trout that have little to no stress from the heat of summer, and that will feed constantly throughout the day.I have written about some of the techniques we use out here in WNY to be...
  • 19

    May

    2015

    The "dancing corn" : Fly Fishing or not?

    With a dry spring and a cool and rainy summer, year 2011 is one of the worst I have known for trout fly fishing.I made a dozen outings with my beaver meadow rods in my usual small brooks, but the water is just too cold and only small trouts come to surface.Even sea fishing is a disaster because of too cold water ...So, hoping for a more favorable September, I fight boredom by fishing carp.In May, I caught many carp thanks to tadpoles imitations. Obviously, the "tadpoles period" lasts only a few weeks, as tadpoles quickly become little frogs that come out of the water.In summer, fishing is more complicated, many carp turning into a vegetable diet. I have taken some carp with nymphs (dragonfly larvae imitation), but the most effective technique in July and August has been for me a fishing with... corn!The technique I'm going to describe necessarily...
  • 19

    May

    2015

    Matt Dinardo, The Salmon River Flea

    This is my first entry as a blogger for the JP ROSS Fly Rod Company. I hope to bring you insight into one of my favorite rivers in central New York, the Salmon River. Just a little bit of history about me and my fly fishing career. I started fishing the Salmon River in 1993, but could not really understand how to drift with a spin casting rod. I spent almost three years on that river before I put a fish on my line. I began fly fishing in 1994 and learned on the West Canada Creek in Herkimer, NY. In the fall of 1996 I brought my 5wt. fly rod to the Salmon River and worked with a guide on how to set up the line for the "High Stick" or the "Chuck and Duck" method. It literally took 3 minutes to put a fish on my line, using...
  • 19

    May

    2015

    Fly fishing for mullet

    Morbihan, the department in which I live, is a coastal region that offers some interesting conditions for sea fishing. The coast is not very rocky, much less than in western and northern Britanny : here we have many beaches, estuaries and mudflats. These are interesting places to fish for mullet, particularly fresh water / salt water mixing zones. In French atlantic waters, it is possible to encounter five different mullet species :1. The thick-lipped grey mullet (Chelon labrosus) ; max length 65 cm.2. The thin-lipped grey mullet (Liza ramada) ; max length 70 cm, which dates back some rivers over large distances, such as the Loire.3. The flathead grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) ; max length 100 cm.4. The golden mullet (Liza aurata) ; max length 55 cm.5. The leaping mullet (Liza Saliens) ; max length 40 cm. It is mainly the first two species the fly fisherman can catch. The...
  • 19

    May

    2015

    Fly Fishing at Letchworth State Park : the Grand Canyon of the East

    My family and I went to Letchworth State Park (south of Rochester) to relax prior to the kitchen remodel and to camp with family. Of course I was thinking about fly fishing, where I can go and what I would be fishing for… so I researched the opportunities on the internet and identified bass, panfish and pike. Great! So I geared up for that with my 6 wt rod and some appropriate flies. Away we went to Letchworth. Wow what a beautiful place (see picture). Who would have thought such a place existed in New York State. This state never stops amazing me. We setup our campsite and enjoyed the evening. The next day we identified the areas that the park had provided as areas to fish. Only 2 places on the Genesee River. The problem was that with the heavy rains we received during this time, the water was...
  • 19

    May

    2015

    Making your own foam strike indicators : Part 1

    I have been playing around with a number of different indicators over the years. And I have been trying to find one that fits all of my nymphing needs. I'm not sure if that is even possible, but I am trying. So far I like or dislike all of them for different reasons and have used them all on different occasions. I have also caught fish while using each different indicator. Here is a list of the ones I have used with pros and cons.1 - Hard foam indicators that require a tooth pick to keep the indicaor in place - These are the ones I use the most. They are durable, Cast well, float well in all situations and stay on the line where they are supposed too. The bad part about them is that if you want to take it off, you have to take the fly and...

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